In the news: New book by art history professor Lawrence Waldron

Congratulations to Professor Waldron for the publication of his latest book! Pre-Columbian Art of the Caribbean is a comprehensive art historical survey of the main archipelago, from Trinidad to Cuba, over some 2,500 years of ceramics, sculpture and carvings, personal adornment, rock art and ritual spaces, with an epilogue that touches on the unexpected living legacies of pre-Columbian Caribbean architecture and furniture in the region and the world at large.

Abundantly illustrated, this volume is a pioneering survey of the ancient art of the entire Caribbean region. While previous studies have focused on the Greater Antilles—Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica—this is the first book also to include the islands of the eastern Caribbean and their ties to pre-Columbian Venezuela.   
 
Lawrence Waldron examines ceramics, ritual spaces, sculpture, and personal adornment from the ancient Saladoid era to the later, better-known Taíno period. Analyzing the symbolism, aesthetics, and cultural contexts of objects including ceremonial pots, rock art, stone effigy belts, and jewelry, he illuminates continuities and innovations in imagery and ideology across time and space. He draws attention to the legacies of Amerindian visual and material culture in the architecture and furniture of the present-day Caribbean, arguing that the region’s ancient art history is rich and worthy of attention.  

Interested in learning more about Caribbean Art? Professor Waldron will be teaching an art history course focusing on this subject for Fall 2019, in his new course offering for ARTH 200 – STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF ART. The course will meet Wednesdays 1:40-4:30pm. Seats for this class are limited, so register soon!

Special studio art course offering for Spring 2019

ARTS 777: History and Theory of Social Practice
Mondays 2:00-5:50pm
Prof. Sholette

Art as History? Art as Thinking? Art as Research? Art as Work? The aim of this seminar is to survey, critique and historicize the theory and practice of activist, interventionist, public, participatory and community based art that operates within and across fields such as performance, urban studies, environmental science and other socially engaged disciplines. The class will focus on such questions as: Why is it useful, even necessary, to understand the history and theory of social practice art? Where should we look to find the historical roots of social practice art? Are these within the history of art, or external to it, in the broader social sphere? In an increasingly privatized society how do we define and operate within a concept of the public sphere? And how are both mainstream and alternative type cultural institutions responding to the increasing interest in socially engaged art by emerging artists? Through lectures, readings, discussions, student presentations, group activities, guest speakers and off-site visits to galleries and museums we will seek to position socially-engaged visual culture and the shifting role of the artist within an historical, ideological, and critical framework.

Special studio art course offering for Spring 2019

The Art department is pleased to offer a special printmaking course in Spring 2019 for both graduate and undergraduate students. With the instruction of experienced printmaker Lisa Mackie, this course will cover Lithography and Monotype Processes. Drawing and printing with litho plates and stones in both black-and-white and color will be presented, as well as photo processes using black-and-white laser prints as a matrix and aluminum photo litho plates. Images may be re-examined, varied, and extended through the exploration of water-based monotype mylar overlays. Catalytic assignments are presented throughout the course. Students will be asked to visually examine their concepts and allow their artwork to develop within the parameters and new territory of lithography and into mixed media. Finally, the course will teach students about the heritage, history, and technology of traditional and contemporary printmaking.

Special studio art course offering for Spring 2019

Becoming Insect, Professor Greg Sholette
ARTS 283/284/288/721/728

Contemporary studio art /social theory/ swarm politics

Klapper 284, Tuesdays 2:00PM – 5:50PM

The QC art department is pleased to offer a new cross-disciplinary course for students of: Art, Media, Environmental Studies, Urban Theory, Music, Sound Art, Theater, Dance, Film, and Writing

Fusing project-based studio practice with individual research this hybrid seminar explores the shifting line between contemporary art and social practice through the lens of what we consider the human and the non-human. Becoming Insect approaches socially engaged cultural learning through interdisciplinary creative expression this course combines artistic methods with environmental observation and scientific studies of arthropod morphology and eusocial behavior patterns, as well as the ways these visual and physical attributes have influenced a wide range of fields including, though not limited to literature, two and three dimensional artistic representation, socially engaged art, photography, 3-D printing, data visualization, fashion arts, media, robotics, urban design, architecture, political theories, and popular culture.

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